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Facts About Hunger in Africa

250 million people are experiencing hunger, which is nearly 20% of the population. It is projected that the region will be unable to feed 60 percent of population by 2025.

What are the causes for the food constraint?

There are several factors that have been identified as constraints to food production in Africa.

  • Poverty – remains one of the most significant causes of hunger. More than half of all Africans live below the poverty line (on less than $1.50 a day). It is this lack of money or other resources to purchase food that results in hunger, both chronic and hidden. Consequently, hunger leads to poverty, as hungry people produce below potential
  • Population growth and urbanization – Africa’s annual urban growth rate is the highest in the world at 4 percent. The cities are already faced with enormous backlogs in housing and infrastructure development. This means food production and economic growth must increase to much the population growth and this is placing pressure on food security
  • Migration from rural to urban areas – poverty in rural areas continues to drive many to urban districts in search of better livelihoods. This deprived of human labor, as the young and able-bodied leave for the cities in search of jobs, further placing pressure on food security
  • Low economic and social status of women, who constitute the majority of food producers – Although women are the primary farmers of agricultural land in most African communities, their access to land is, on average, less than half that of men.
  • Land degradation
  • Mismanagement of available water resources
  • Pests and diseases
  • Inappropriate food production and storage practices
  • Inadequate food processing technologies
  • Civil conflicts and wars
  • Poor economic policies to support food production

As you might imagine, hunger is a problem that most often affects orphaned and vulnerable children living in extreme poverty, low-income families, homeless and street children, the needy, the poor, the widow and vulnerable people.

There is Hope and Not All Is Lost 
Together, We Can Help Those That Are Hungry and Hurting

Although one can see that Africa’s problems are enormous, there are many opportunities to improve conditions for the majority of the suffering poor and the needy.

Immediate Solutions

Bread of Life International strategy seeks to ensure food is immediately available to the poor and needy orphans, children, families, widows, and vulnerable people that are hungry, hurting, and experiencing crisis or extreme hardship.

Long-term Solutions

while working with partners to find long-term solutions to eliminate hunger by

  • Investing more in the agriculture sector – agriculture is an integral part of the African economy – and the daily lives of the majority of Africans. It accounts for some 60% of jobs across the continent. Despite its central role, the agricultural sector accounts for 16.5% of African GDP due to its low productivity, and Africa’s cereal yield is only 41% of the international average. Production can be bolstered by increasing large scale productivity by growing more local staple food crops –  such as rice, maize, soybean and poultry, banana and plantain, cassava, cowpea, maize, soybean, and yam that will ensure economic security and self-sufficiency
  • Expanding agricultural financing – Private investment and commercial bank lending for agriculture (flagship program: risk-sharing facility) and Non-bank small and medium-enterprise finance and capacity-building
  • Encouraging inclusive growth by involving more women and youth in agriculture, increase in women –owned agriculture and agribusiness enterprises that will increase employment, contribute to alleviating poverty through job creation and providing sustainable livelihoods
  • Establishing institutions to train more farmers, women, youth, and students in farming and food production
  • Partnering with African institutions that work to improve crops, yields , ensure best agricultural practices, promote new technologies and modern farming techniques for farmers in Africa
  • Reducing land degradation, mismanagement of available water resources – managing resources in a sustainable way to prevent soil erosion, maintain soil fertility, use water more efficiently, and protect the environment

Why Our Work Matters

Freedom from hunger has been described as a fundamental human right, and the African Union Malabo Declaration and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 2 call for ending hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition, and promoting sustainable food systems by 2025 and 2030 respectively, and this is a priority of Bread of Life International.

We seek to end and eliminate hunger across Africa. We want to ensure every family in Africa has enough safe, nutritious, and sufficient food. Africa with zero hunger can positively impact the economies, health, education, equality and social development for the people and world at large. 

Support Our Mission to End Hunger

Donate to save the lives of needy, the poor, orphaned, vulnerable children, widow, seniors, low-income families and vulnerable people that experiencing hunger and are hurting

Join the movement to end hunger in Africa for good.